Saturday, October 24, 2009

Beak> marginally greater than average

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BRISTOL'S Beak> and their self titled album are the latest project from Geoff Barrow, the force behind Portishead - whose album Third was 2008's Sound Advice Album Of The Year, no less.
But the trio's post rock-meets-instrumental hip hop is disappointingly one dimensional - sounding like Portishead, only on tranquilisers, in a bag.
At times, such as on I Know and Iron Acton, a Get The Blessing-referencing groove is added to the mix, adding much needed drive to proceedings - and at these points Beak> are a force to be reckoned with.
But ultimately, the meandering Beak> seems to have little point - perhaps they should have called it Bill).

9 comments:

  1. Instrumental Hip Hop? Oh dear, you didn't listen to the album!

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  2. Yes I did. End of discussion.

    What kind of charlatan would I be to not listen to an album and post a review of it?

    I drive myself into the ground to review all the albums I get sent - that equates to between one and two a day, which is quite a lot for a one-man blog.

    So Mr Anonymous, you're welcome to voice an opinion on my reviews, but to suggest I don't even listen to it is more than a little insulting.

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  3. I also found this album lacking. Not surprising given the limitations the band set themselves. They underachieved.

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  4. Instrumental hip-hop is pretty off the mark. Unless you mean you could rap over it. Which I guess you could do with any instrumental music. I particularly like Schubert's instrumental hip-hop.

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  5. Sarcasm is the lowest form of instrumental hip hop.
    And pigeonholing argument aside, the album is still a disappointment.

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  6. But instrumental hip hop? Really? Are you qualified? You obviously don't have a clue. Oh yes, it's Mrs Anonymous to you.

    ReplyDelete

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